Forkenbrock Series on Public Policy

 

Feeding the World: Challenges for Water Quality and Quantity

Old Brick Church & Community Center, 26 Market St., Iowa City
Thursday, April 9th, 2015 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

As part of the University of Iowa's "Food for Thought" semester-long schedule of activities, the Public Policy Center, in partnership with the UI Water Sustainability Initiative, hosted a special session on the interface of food production, agriculture and water quality.  The symposium included several speakers and panelists with diverse perspectives on the past, present and sustainable future of food production in Iowa.

The symposium “Feeding the World: Challenges for Water Quality and Quantity” was held Thursday, April 9, 2015 at the Old Brick Church and Community Center in Iowa City.    

Content from the symposium can be found on the Presentations tab below.

Thursday, April 9th, 2015
Session Details Speakers
8:15 AM Coffee & Registration
9:00 AM Welcome Remarks
  1. Peter Damiano
  2. Dave Cwiertny
9:15 AM Water Sustainability Cluster Round Table
  1. Eric Tate
  2. Kajsa Dalrymple
  3. Kelly Baker
  4. Craig Just
  1. Jerald L. Schnoor, PhD, PE, BCEE (Moderator)
10:00 AM Morning Keynote
  1. Bill Stowe
  1. Larry Weber (Moderator)
10:45 AM Panel One: Historical Perspectives on Agriculture and Food Production in Iowa
  1. Todd Dresser
  2. Keith Schilling
  1. Liz Christiansen (Moderator)
12:00 PM Lunch & Keynote Speaker
  1. Sean McMahon
  1. Rick Cruse (Moderator)
1:00 PM Panel Two: Present Farming Practices and their Implications for Water Resources
  1. Mark B. David
  2. Matt Russell
  3. Matt Lechtenberg
  1. Marty St. Clair (Moderator)
2:30 PM Afternoon Break
2:45 PM Panel Three: A Vision for the Future of Food Production in Iowa, and Q&A
  1. Matt Liebman
  2. Lori Abendroth
  3. Dick Sloan
  4. Jason Grimm
  5. Grant Schultz
  6. Suzan Erem
  1. Francis Thicke (Moderator)
4:30 PM Wrap Up
  1. Dave Cwiertny
  • Lori Abendroth

    Iowa State University - USDA-NIFA funded Climate & Corn-based Cropping Systems Coordinated Agricultural Project

    Abendroth is the Project Manager for a USDA-NIFA funded Coordinated Agricultural Project since 2011. The multi-state team is assessing the environmental, economic and social impacts of long-term climate variability on corn-based cropping systems in the Midwest. She manages a diverse, transdisciplinary team comprised of 140 scientists, research staff, educators, and graduate students across 9 states and 11 institutions.

    Professionally and personally, Abendroth is passionate about equipping and empowering others in addressing challenges and working towards a better world for every single individual. She has been involved with small to large production systems in efforts to improve sustainability, agricultural productivity, and resiliency. She believes that agronomists have a unique opportunity to employ science-driven, practical solutions in addressing the challenges facing our global society. 


    Abendroth is from eastern Nebraska and has been involved with her family’s farming operation throughout the years. She has spoken in over 150 meetings to farmers, agronomists, scientists, and students and been a primary or contributing author to more than 100 extension newsletters, extension publications, reports, and refereed journals. From 2005-2011, Abendroth was an Associate Corn Agronomist at Iowa State University. Abendroth has earned BS degree in Agronomy (2001) and MS degree in Crop Physiology and Production (2004) from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and is currently in the PhD program at Iowa State University in Crop Production and Physiology.
     

  • Kelly Baker

    UI College of Public Health (Occupational & Environmental Health), UI Water Sustainability Initiative

    Dr. Baker's research focuses on understanding how poor water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) conditions affect maternal and child health in low-income communities. Part of her work is focused on using systems-level approaches to characterize the ecology of disease transmission, beginning with understanding how limitations in water and sanitation access affect variability in human behavior, and how behavior and the associated environmental stressors interact to create exposure that leads to a broad spectrum of adverse health outcomes. She explores a spectrum of outcomes, from diarrhea and malnutrition in young children to reproductive tract infections in women to adverse pregnancy outcomes. She is particularly interested in methodological challenges of evaluating impacts from community-level interventions, especially around the topic of sanitation management. Another part of Dr. Baker's work involves developing scientifically rigorous tools and strategies for conducting microbial risk assessments that can track how sanitation-associated microbes spatially disperse in ecological systems populated by human populations.

  • Dave Cwiertny

    UI Civil & Environmental Engineering

    David M. Cwiertny is an Associate Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Iowa.  He also holds an appointment in the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering. He joined the faculty at Iowa in the Fall of 2011 after four years as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Riverside.

     

    David holds B.S. in Environmental Engineering Science and minor in Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley (2000), a Ph.D. from the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at Johns Hopkins University (2006), and he previously conducted post-doctoral research at the University of Iowa in a joint appointment between the Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Chemistry.

     

    His research group broadly focuses on pollutant fate in natural and engineered systems, with a particular emphasis on emerging pollutant transformation pathways and the development of materials-based treatment technologies that promote water sustainability. He is the recipient of an NSF CAREER award (2010) and his group is supported by the US EPA, USDA, SERDP and the NSF.

     

    At the University of Iowa, he is a core faculty member in the campus-wide Water Sustainability Initiative, developing interdisciplinary research, outreach and education programs intended to increase water awareness at the University and across the state of Iowa. He is also an associate research engineer at IIHR—Hydroscience & Engineering. He has developed courses at both the graduate and undergraduate levels related to society’s pursuit of sustainable water resources, and is the current Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

     

    In 2014, David became the Editor-in-Chief of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology, a new RSC journal devoted to water research and technology in the built environment. He also serves on the editorial advisory board for Environmental Science and Technology, and is an active member of the American Chemical Society, the Royal Society of Chemistry, and the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors. 

  • Dave Cwiertny

    UI Civil & Environmental Engineering

    David M. Cwiertny is an Associate Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Iowa.  He also holds an appointment in the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering. He joined the faculty at Iowa in the Fall of 2011 after four years as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Riverside.

     

    David holds B.S. in Environmental Engineering Science and minor in Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley (2000), a Ph.D. from the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at Johns Hopkins University (2006), and he previously conducted post-doctoral research at the University of Iowa in a joint appointment between the Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Chemistry.

     

    His research group broadly focuses on pollutant fate in natural and engineered systems, with a particular emphasis on emerging pollutant transformation pathways and the development of materials-based treatment technologies that promote water sustainability. He is the recipient of an NSF CAREER award (2010) and his group is supported by the US EPA, USDA, SERDP and the NSF.

     

    At the University of Iowa, he is a core faculty member in the campus-wide Water Sustainability Initiative, developing interdisciplinary research, outreach and education programs intended to increase water awareness at the University and across the state of Iowa. He is also an associate research engineer at IIHR—Hydroscience & Engineering. He has developed courses at both the graduate and undergraduate levels related to society’s pursuit of sustainable water resources, and is the current Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

     

    In 2014, David became the Editor-in-Chief of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology, a new RSC journal devoted to water research and technology in the built environment. He also serves on the editorial advisory board for Environmental Science and Technology, and is an active member of the American Chemical Society, the Royal Society of Chemistry, and the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors. 

  • Kajsa Dalrymple

    UI School of Journalism & Mass Communication, UI Water Sustainability Initiative

    Kajsa Dalrymple is an Assistant Professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication and a faculty associate of the Water Sustainability Initiative at The University of Iowa. Her research focuses on the intersection between science, strategic communication, and public policy. Recently, Dalrymple has been examining the ways that water issues are discussed in local news outlets and how such coverage may influence public opinion toward water sustainability.

  • Peter Damiano

    Director, Public Policy Center

    Peter Damiano is the Director of the Public Policy Center (PPC) and Professor, Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry at the University of Iowa. He started the health policy research program at the PPC in 1990 and has been Director of the Center since July 2007. He is a health services researcher who investigates issues relating to access to care, quality, cost and outcomes of care. Dr. Damiano has authored over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles and research monographs and has been the principal investigator on over 50 research studies funded by federal, state and Foundation sources. He is a former staff intern in the US Senate, a Robert Wood Johnson Dental Health Services Research Scholar and HRSA Primary Care Policy Fellow. He is a graduate of the University of Iowa College of Dentistry (DDS) and UCLA School of Public Health (MPH).

  • Mark B. David

    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Mark B. David is a Professor in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and has been on the faculty since 1985. He studies nitrogen and phosphorus cycling in agricultural fields, losses to streams and rivers, and methods to reduce these losses such as fertilizer application timing, cover crops, drainage water management, constructed wetlands, and bioreactors. His research team conducts long-term monitoring of water quality in several tile-drained watersheds in east-central Illinois to better understand the mechanisms of nutrient loss and to evaluate the effectiveness of nutrient loss reduction methods. He has degrees from Penn State University, the University of Maine, and the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry. 

  • Todd Dresser

    University of Wisconsin - Green Bay

    My current research looks at the development of rural sociology from the Progressive Era until the early years of the Cold War. Surprisingly, it finds that the family farm was not a central object of concern for the discipline until the years leading up to World War II. Rather, social scientists at the turn of the twentieth century such as Liberty Hyde Bailey and Charles Galpin worried that "family farm values" such as independence and self-reliance were out dated in an era dominated by trusts, corporations, and other forms of collective enterprise. A second generation breathed new life into these values, however, as they became increasingly eager to distinguish industrial agriculture in the U.S. from that under authoritarian regimes in Europe. As a result, key figures such as Carl Taylor and Carle Zimmerman reversed the stance of a previous generation. They saw the nuclear family farm as a bastion of individualism amid the conformity and creeping totalitarianism of postwar mass society. Between 1890 and 1960, rural sociologists, by and large, went from fearing for the future of individual farms to fearing for the future if the family farm no longer supported individualism.

     

    I graduated with a PhD in history under the supervision of William Cronon from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2011. Since then I worked at the Univeristy of Wisconsin-Oshkosh and the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. Since 2014, I have worked at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay where I wear two hats: one as an Associate Lecturer of History and the second as an instructional technologist, where my job is to strategize UW-Green Bay's online learning mission.

  • Suzan Erem

    Sustainable Iowa Land Trust

    Suzan Erem is a lifelong community and union organizer as well as professional working writer. Suzan graduated from the University of Iowa in the mid-1980s with a dual degree in Journalism and English, but soon became active saving family farms. Job opportunities eventually dragged her out of Iowa.

     

    Suzan returned to 80 acres in Cedar County in 2010 to see young people locked out of farming while the local food movement was growing exponentially. She and her husband Paul Durrenberger scanned the horizon and saw many worthy organizations training new farmers, building local food networks and supporting sustainable farming methods, but no one tackling the daunting issue land speculation and its pervasive effect on fruit, vegetable and small livestock farmers.

     

    After two years of research and networking, she helped gather 25 of the best minds in sustainable agriculture, planning, development and advocacy together to launch SILT so beginning farmers can pursue a life of growing healthy food and local food fans can enjoy their farmers markets and locally-sourced food restaurants long after the farms that grow that food change hands.

  • Jason Grimm

    Iowa Valley Resource Conservation & Development (RC&D)

    Jason manages his own farm enterprises while farming alongside his parents and grandparents at Grimm Family Farm near North English. Grimm Family Farm raises dry beans, pastured poultry and produce for local markets. The farm raises small grains, corn, and alfalfa for feed for its livestock.  Jason and his wife Hannah and their son Elliot live in Williamsburg.


    Jason continues to work full time as the Food System Planner with Iowa Valley RC&D. Jason is the project manager of the RC&D’s Regional Food Initiative. Jason manages 6 program topic areas; local farmer education and training, regional food system metrics, Come to the Table Summit, Iowa Valley regional farm to school, The Iowa Valley food business development and the Iowa Valley food policy program. Jason works with local and county governments, health authorities, schools, producers, non-profit organizations, food processors and developers who are working to build a sustainable food and agriculture system in the Iowa Corridor Region that includes Benton, Iowa, Johnson, Linn, Tama, Poweshiek, Washington, Cedar and Jones counties.


    Jason in addition manages the Iowa Valley Food Co-op in Cedar Rapids. Jason co-founded the Co-op in 2011. The Co-op is a web-based cooperative that aggregates orders for household and wholesale business members directly from area farmers and other local businesses, and facilitating delivery to customers.


    Jason has degrees in Landscape Architecture and Environmental Studies from Iowa State University, with an emphasis in regional and urban food system design and planning. In 2009 Jason’s research awarded him with a 2009 American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) President’s Award for academic excellence, and an ASLA Certificate of Honor. In 2008 and 2009 Jason conducted his senior thesis Food Urbanism that he termed based on his interests in urban planning and urban food systems. His research, how food relates to the organization of a city and how it becomes infrastructure that transforms the urban experience, included research on urban agriculture in London and interviews with officials and local farmers in Ames, IA and the surrounding counties.

  • Craig Just

    Assistant Professor Civil and Environmental Engineering Assistant Research Engineer IIHR-Hydroscience & Engineering University of Iowa

    Dr. Craig Just has served the College of Engineering at the University of Iowa since 1993.  He earned a masters degree in chemistry from the University of Northern Iowa in 1994 and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering and science from the University of Iowa in 2001.  He is an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and an assistant research engineer at IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering.  He is also the Coordinator of Sustainability Programs for the College of Engineering.


    Dr. Just teaches Introduction to Sustainability, an interdisciplinary course targeted toward underclass students pursuing the new University of Iowa, Certificate in Sustainability. Dr. Just also teaches Design for the Developing World, also an interdisciplinary course targeted toward upperclass students interested in advancing sustainable development in resource-poor countries.  Dr. Just was awarded the University of Iowa, President and Provost Award for Teaching Excellence in 2008 for creative utilization of service-learning and for engaged scholarship through teaching.

    Dr. Just is Faculty Advisor for the UI Student Chapter of U.S. Green Building Council and he coordinates the UI International Engineering Service Program. Dr. Just was awarded the David J. Skorton Award for Staff Excellence in Public Service in 2010.  Dr. Just was also received the 2011 International Studies Outstanding Faculty Mentor Award.

  • Matt Lechtenberg

    Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

    As Water Quality Initiative (WQI) Coordinator for the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship (IDALS), Matt manages implementation activities of the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy (NRS).  Lechtenberg has worked for IDALS since 2006, working on various programs that implement, research, and demonstrate conservation practices in the State.

  • Matt Liebman

    Sustainable Agriculture, Iowa State University

    Matt Liebman is a professor of agronomy and the Henry A. Wallace Endowed Chair for Sustainable Agriculture at Iowa State University. He received an A.B. in biological sciences from Harvard University in 1978 and a Ph.D. in botany from the University of California-Berkeley in1986, and became a fellow of the American Society of Agronomy in 2009. His research, teaching, and outreach activities focus on ways to increase soil, water, and wildlife conservation in farming systems, while reducing dependence on agrichemicals and fossil fuels.

  • Sean McMahon

    Iowa Agriculture Water Alliance

    Sean McMahon is executive director of the Iowa Agriculture Water Alliance, a clean-water initiative supported by the Iowa Corn Growers Association, Iowa Soybean Association and Iowa Pork Producers Association. In that capacity he works to help increase the pace and scale of the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy by encouraging Iowa farmers to adopt voluntary conservation practices aimed at reducing nitrogen and phosphorus in waterways.

     

    Previously Sean was North America agriculture program director of The Nature Conservancy, focused on strategies to make agriculture more environmentally sustainable including through more effective advocacy and implementation of the Farm Bill, strategic partnerships with agribusinesses, and engaging in agricultural supply chain initiatives designed to help farmers produce more food, feed, fiber and fuel in an increasingly sustainable manner.

     

    Sean has worked on natural resources policy for over twenty years. He served as state director of the Conservancy’s Iowa Chapter, implementing statewide strategies to improve natural resources conservation. His work included leadership efforts to conserve Iowa’s most important natural areas. As chair of the Iowa’s Water and Land Legacy Campaign, he also led a successful effort and coalition of more than 130 organizations dedicated to securing increased funding for clean water, soil conservation and wetland restoration. Before joining the Conservancy, Sean directed national land stewardship campaigns for the National Wildlife Federation (NWF). There he advanced national policy and advocacy work to protect public and private lands—most notably sites such as the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and the Rocky Mountain Front in Montana. Sean also led NWF’s agriculture policy work leading up to the 2008 Farm Bill.

     

    His experience with agricultural policy extends back to 2001, when he worked on the 2002 Farm Bill as assistant director of government relations for the National Audubon Society. In addition, Sean worked for the Department of the Interior in a variety of capacities, including as deputy director and acting director of the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs where he received two vice-presidential awards for his work to reinvent government.

  • Matt Russell

    Drake University Agricultural Law Center

    Matt Russell is State Food Policy Project Coordinator at Drake University Agricultural Law Center where he is responsible for projects relating to improving the opportunities in Iowa's agricultural and rural economy. He joined the Center staff in April 2006 and has worked on issues concerning retail agriculture, land tenure, conservation, climate change, farmer veterans, rural development, state food policy, and federal farm policy.  Matt grew up on a family farm near Anita in Cass County, received his B.A. from Loras College in Dubuque, and studied for the Catholic Diocese of Des Moines at the University of St. Mary of the Lake, Mundelein Seminary in Illinois. In 2003 he earned an M.S. in Rural Sociology from Iowa State University, with a concentration in community food systems. In addition to his work at Drake, Matt and his husband Patrick Standley operate Coyote Run Farm, a 110 acre farm in rural Lacona and market fresh produce, eggs, and beef at farmers markets and other local outlets. He serves on the Iowa Farm Service Agency State Committee of the USDA and the Marion County Development Commission.  Before coming to Drake, Matt worked as an organizer for Iowa Citizen Action Network, worked for the National Catholic Rural Life Conference, and taught at Bishop Gorman High School in Las Vegas, Nevada. He has taught Sociology at Des Moines Area Community College and an undergraduate course at Drake about Cuba in transition. His work on food and agriculture, has taken him to 26 states, the District of Columbia, Scotland, Italy, and Cuba. 

  • Keith Schilling

    UI Dept. of Earth & Environmental Sciences

    Keith Schilling is a research engineer at the Iowa Geological Survey and an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Iowa. He received a B.A. from Knox College, an M.S. degree from Iowa State University and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Iowa. Keith conducts research on a variety of water-related issues in Iowa, including surface and groundwater interaction, nonpoint source pollution and watershed and floodplain processes.

  • Grant Schultz

    Versaland

    Grant is the Founder of Versaland and known in some circles as the “Mad Scientist of Permaculture”.  Grant develops new tools and techniques for creating and managing agroecosystems, including droughtproofing soils with GPS technology, breeding tree crops, and building electric tractors.  Grant's Iowa City farm, Versaland, is a pioneering broadacre permaculture farm producing livestock, fruit, and vegetables in an integrated system. Learn more at Versaland.com

  • Dick Sloan

    Lime Creek Watershed Improvement Association

    Dick Sloan started farming in 1978, raising corn, soybeans, and hogs on his family’s farm near Brandon, Iowa.  In 2006, he and neighboring farmers formed the Lime Creek Watershed Improvement Association, working to show how crop rotations, tillage and fertilization practices can reduce nutrient loss to the environment.  Dick began growing cover crops in 2011 and now plants covers on all 700 rotated no-till crop acres he farms. He is a member of Practical Farmers of Iowa, Cedar River Watershed Coalition, an Assistant Commissioner for the Buchanan County Soil and Water Conservation District, and a partner with Iowa Learning Farms.

  • Bill Stowe

    CEO and General Manager, Des Moines Water Works

    Bill Stowe is the CEO and General Manager of Des Moines Water Works (DMWW). DMWW is a regional utility that protects public health and promotes economic development by delivering outstanding quality water affordably in reliable quantities. DMWW works closely with business, environmental, consumer and agricultural leaders to advocate for better stewardship of water resources and clean water initiatives throughout Central Iowa.


    Bill is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Grinnell College with a Bachelor of Arts, and received a Master of Science in Engineering from the University of Wisconsin, a Master of Science in Industrial Relations from the University of Illinois, and a Juris Doctorate Degree from Loyola University Law School. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and a member of the Iowa Bar Association. He frequently acts through the American Arbitration Association as an impartial arbitrator in resolving complex construction and commercial disputes.

  • Eric Tate

    Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, University of Iowa

    Originally from Texas, Eric earned his PhD in geography from the University of South Carolina. He currently serves as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Iowa. His research lies at the nexus of natural hazards and society, with particular focus on vulnerability and contemporary environmental issues, flood loss estimation, uncertainty analysis, and geospatial modeling. He teaches courses on water resources, hazards and disasters, environmental justice, and sustainability indicators. Outside of academia, Eric enjoys spending time with his wife and two kids, visiting national parks, and playing tennis.

The Public Policy Center would like to thank the following for their support of this event:

 

Leader Sponsors ($1000 and Up):

IIHR Hydroscience & EngineeringCenter for Health Effects of Environmental Contamination (CHEEC)Center for Global & Regional Environmental Research

 

Partner Sponsors ($500-$999):

UI Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering

 

Colleague Sponsors ($250-$499):

UI Office of Sustainability, Coe College

 

Friend Sponsors (Up to $249):

UI School of Urban & Regional Planning

 

In-Kind Sponsors:

Iowa City Area Chamber of Commerce

 

        
 

    

 

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Leslie Gannon at (319) 335-6817 or leslie-gannon@uiowa.edu.