Factors Affecting Hospital Charges and Length of Stay from Teenage Motor Vehicle Crash-Related Hospitalizations Among United States Teenagers, 2002-2007

Abstract
Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for all teenagers, and each year a far greater number of teens are hospitalized with non-fatal injuries. This retrospective cohort study used the National Inpatient Sample data to examine hospitalizations from the years 2002 to 2007 for 15 to 18-year-old teenagers who had been admitted due to a motor vehicle crash. More than 23,000 teens were hospitalized for motor vehicle-related crash injuries each year, for a total of 139,880 over the six-year period. Total hospital charges exceeded $1 billion almost every year, with a median hospital charge of more than $25,000. Older teens, boys, those with fractures, internal injuries or intracranial injuries, and Medicaid/Medicare as a payer were associated with higher hospital charges and longer lengths of stay. These high charges and hospitalization periods pose a significant burden on teens, their families, and the health care system.
Peek-Asa, C., Yang, J., Ramirez, M., Hamann, C., & Cheng, G. (2011). Factors Affecting Hospital Charges and Length of Stay from Teenage Motor Vehicle Crash-Related Hospitalizations Among United States Teenagers, 2002-2007. Accident; Analysis And Prevention, 43(3), 595-600. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.aap.2010.07.019